Grants Provide Funding to Find Science Teachers

Grants Provide Funding to Find Science Teachers

Schools ranging from middle school to college level courses are missing good science teachers o meet the demand for filling science classrooms. Foundations and organizations, such as the National Science Foundation are trying to lessen this shortage by providing grants for educational institutions to find the science teachers it needs. For example, Kennesaw State University was the recent recipient of a $2.85 million grant to meet the increasing demand to fill science teacher positions in middle schools and high schools across the nation. Kennesaw State University intends to use the grant money to create a special program called the Recruiting and Retaining Teacher Leaders in Physics and Chemistry project.

The Recruiting and Retaining Teacher Leaders in Physics and Chemistry project goal is to get teachers who are already working as science teachers to go back to school to earn their Master of Arts in Teaching. With the grant money, the university intends to provide scholarships to science teachers with at least three years of teaching experience to return to earn a higher degree. Money from the economic stimulus package is also in use to prepare more teachers to teach science and other subjects experiencing a teacher shortage.

Kennesaw State University intends to start with a group of 32 teaches that will receive scholarships as a means to develop the teacher leadership program. Noyce Teaching Fellows also provide a grant of up to $50,000 for teachers, but the teachers are required spend four years working in one of the Georgia schools in return.

Whether you are in the process of earning your degree to teach science or would like to further your education, you may be able to accomplish either one with grant money from the federal government or state where you live and intend to work.

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